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FAQ - Education

1. Has mass-produced distribution of meteorite samples been discussed to help students in more schools learn about this topic?

The Astronomical Society of the Pacific has a meteorite kit it is developing as part of a larger program. If you go to http://www.astrosociety.org, there is a link to their Night Sky Network. The Tucson Amateur Astronomy Association will get at least one kit created by PSI.

2. Where can rock/sediment samples be purchased for a class?

Try Ward's Natural Science for rock samples (http://www.wardsci.com) and Acme Sand for gravel and sand (http://www.acmesand.com; in Tucson, AZ).

3. Are there educational sites for kids?

1) The Explorer’s guide to Impact Craters has lots of information about impact craters -- http://www.psi.edu/explorecraters

2) Volcano World for Kids has lots of information about volcanoes on Earth -- http://volcano.oregonstate.edu/kids/index.html

3) Jet Propulsion Laboratory has materials for K-4 and middle school levels -- http://www.jpl.nasa.gov

4) University of Colorado has gas simulation programs -- http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/gas-properties

5) Orbital simulations on YouTube -- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cNGR4sm__54&p=E09ABAE8A7C8BD40&playnext=1&index=2

4. Are there other resources that address common misconceptions surrounding the Earth/Moon system?

5. What is the data collection center for all outer space activity for the entire world (Earth)? Where are all past records kept of the first scientists? Is there a museum or DVD documentary that covers information on Earth and the Moon?

There is no single place that has all outer space data. Many different countries have their own missions and are now collecting huge amounts of data. In the U.S. there is the Planetary Data System which has much of the US mission-related material. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory has lots of planetary images. There are Imagery Centers at several universities and there are places that have information specific to planetary studies (the Asteroid and Interplanetary Dust Subnode is at PSI).

A good source for educational material on the Moon is the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston. See http://www.lpi.usra.edu/education/resources/s_system/moon.shtml

There is also a nice collection of videos and animations related to current moon research. See http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/search/Keyword/Moon.html

For a NASA e-clip, see http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/nasaeclips/index.html

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